Metal Monday! Wasted Years

by Iron Maiden

~ Who let the synths out? ~

Iron Maiden tried to do something different on their seventh album. Back in the studio after their mega “World Slavery Tour” the Irons wanted to do something a little different. The songwriting was still excellent, with complex lyrical themes that were never even attempted by most other metal bands. But musically, the band tried to incorporate guitar synthesizers for some of their mix. While they weren’t as blatant is Judas Priest’s contemporary album (Turbo) they were certainly a departure from the usual Iron Maiden mix. 

They were most noticeable on this track, which really isn’t a huge departure from most Maiden tunes. The guitar synthesizers blend in much better then you’d expect, and it’s really the soaring chorus the feels different compared to most of their tunes. Bruce stretches himself vocally on this album more than the rest of the band stretch themselves musically, but it was the guitar synthesizer that got all the attention at the time.

Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm

by Crash Test Dummies

~ Weird Al’s parody was better ~

Probably the easiest example to throw in here is a song that doesn’t just have a wordless chorus, but a wordless title. This song was huge in the ’90s and even got a parody (that was better than the actual song!) from Weird Al. But it was always kind of a gimme for this week given that there are clearly no words in the chorus and the title of the song matches the chorus.

It’s not like haven’t had some crap songs on this site before, so we’re not really breaking new ground here.

This week, we’re covering nothing but songs with wordless choruses – every one of the tunes this week has a chorus with no words in it.

Cars

by Gary Numan

~ The 80s keyboard savant… from the 70s ~

You know this riff, I know this riff, everybody knows this riff. There’s no words to it, but if you don’t think it’s the chorus to this song, then you just don’t understand songwriting.

It’s pretty clear how the title of the song ties in with the lyrics given that it’s one of the most repeated words and often used as the last word before the chorus riff kicks in. It’s also very clearly a wordless chorus on Numan’s only real hit.

It’s always lumped in with ’80s music, even though the song was released in 1979, probably because of its prominence on MTV in the early days.

This week, we’re covering nothing but songs with wordless choruses – every one of the tunes this week has a chorus with no words in it.